Robert Howton

Robert Howton

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Koç University

I am Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Koç University in Istanbul. I received my PhD in 2017 from the Department of Philosophy and the Collaborative Programme in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at the University of Toronto. Before coming to Koç, I was Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh.

My research interests lie principally in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and the philosophy of perception. Currently, I am writing on a cluster of topics in Aristotle’s psychology and natural science, including: perceptual discrimination, the metaphysics of color and other sensible qualities, the epistemic value of sense experience, and the status of soul as a final cause in the Aristotelian life sciences.

Experience

 
 
 
 
 

Assistant Professor

Koç University

September 2018 – Present Istanbul, Turkey
 
 
 
 
 

Visiting Lecturer

University of Pittsburgh

January 2016 – May 2018 Pennsylvania, USA

Education

 
 
 
 
 

PhD in Philosophy

University of Toronto

September 2010 – March 2017 Ontario, Canada
 
 
 
 
 

Visiting Scholar

University of Pittsburgh

August 2015 – May 2016 Pennsylvania, USA
 
 
 
 
 

Visiting Assistant in Research

Yale University

January 2015 – May 2015 Connecticut, USA
 
 
 
 
 

Visiting Graduate

University of Oxford

April 2013 – June 2013 Oxfordshire, UK
Center for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity, Corpus Christi College
 
 
 
 
 

MA in Philosophy

Texas A&M University

August 2008 – May 2010 Texas, USA
 
 
 
 
 

BA with Honors in Philosophy

Louisiana State University

August 2003 – May 2007 Louisiana, USA

Papers

(2019). Why De Anima Needs III 12-13. Aristote et l’Âme Humaine: Lectures de De Anima III Offertes à Michel Crubellier, edited by Gweltaz Guyomarc’h, Claire Louguet, and Charlotte Murgier. Leuven: Peeters.

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Teaching

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Aristotle's Soul

Color and Color Experience

Early Modern Philosophy

Illusion: When Appearances Deceive

The Problem of the Criterion